Poupak's Parisian Life in New York

I am a French-Iranian woman with a passion for comedy. I have been lucky enough to be performing all over New York since 2010. I was a TV producer and a head writer for a morning live news show in France, as well as a free lance journalist and a book editor for many years.

Now, I am a life and a career coach (member of ICF), an improviser, a writer, and a show producer. I love my life!

I am a performer at the UCB & sometimes produce shows at The PIT in New York.

My French Tumblr: La Vie à l'Impro

I contribute to BuzzFeed.

I fight cancer with a passion - I want to contribute to a world where cancer will be as benign as a simple cold. Where you can donate against cancer of any kind and give hope to families and patients

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Posts tagged "Diversity"

After learning my flight was detained 4 hours,
I heard the announcement:
If anyone in the vicinity of gate 4-A understands any Arabic,
Please come to the gate immediately.

Well—one pauses these days. Gate 4-A was my own gate. I went there.
An older woman in full traditional Palestinian dress,
Just like my grandma wore, was crumpled to the floor, wailing loudly.
Help, said the flight service person. Talk to her. What is her
Problem? we told her the flight was going to be four hours late and she
Did this.

I put my arm around her and spoke to her haltingly.
Shu dow-a, shu- biduck habibti, stani stani schway, min fadlick,
Sho bit se-wee?

The minute she heard any words she knew—however poorly used—
She stopped crying.

She thought our flight had been canceled entirely.
She needed to be in El Paso for some major medical treatment the
Following day. I said no, no, we’re fine, you’ll get there, just late,

Who is picking you up? Let’s call him and tell him.
We called her son and I spoke with him in English.
I told him I would stay with his mother till we got on the plane and
Would ride next to her—Southwest.

She talked to him. Then we called her other sons just for the fun of it.

Then we called my dad and he and she spoke for a while in Arabic and
Found out of course they had ten shared friends.

Then I thought just for the heck of it why not call some Palestinian
Poets I know and let them chat with her. This all took up about 2 hours.

She was laughing a lot by then. Telling about her life. Answering
Questions.

She had pulled a sack of homemade mamool cookies—little powdered
Sugar crumbly mounds stuffed with dates and nuts—out of her bag—
And was offering them to all the women at the gate.

To my amazement, not a single woman declined one. It was like a
Sacrament. The traveler from Argentina, the traveler from California,
The lovely woman from Laredo—we were all covered with the same
Powdered sugar. And smiling. There are no better cookies.

And then the airline broke out the free beverages from huge coolers—
Non-alcoholic—and the two little girls for our flight, one African
American, one Mexican American—ran around serving us all apple juice
And lemonade and they were covered with powdered sugar too.

And I noticed my new best friend—by now we were holding hands—
Had a potted plant poking out of her bag, some medicinal thing,

With green furry leaves. Such an old country traveling tradition. Always
Carry a plant. Always stay rooted to somewhere.

And I looked around that gate of late and weary ones and thought,
This is the world I want to live in. The shared world.

Not a single person in this gate—once the crying of confusion stopped
—has seemed apprehensive about any other person.

They took the cookies. I wanted to hug all those other women too.
This can still happen anywhere.

Not everything is lost.

Naomi Shihab Nye (b. 1952), “Wandering Around an Albuquerque Airport Terminal.” I think this poem may be making the rounds, this week, but that’s as it should be.  (via oliviacirce)

When I lose hope in the world, I remember this poem.

(via bookoisseur)

Absolute LOVE.  Just discovered this and felt the need to share the love and spread hope.

(via talkingbreakfast)

ucbdifference:

Just a reminder that the UCB Training Center summer diversity scholarship applications are due TODAY Wed Aug 7th.

Fill them out here: http://newyork.ucbtrainingcenter.com/diversity

If you’re in New York and interested in improv, this might be a good place to start…

star-spangledpanties:

I just want to say that this is why minority representation in the media matters. Mae Jemison was inspired to become an astronaut after watching Nichelle Nichols as Uhura on Star Trek. 

Improv principle number xx : if this is true, then what else is true…?

Go Diversity!

(via wilwheaton)

We have decided to make the holiday Soul Glo Projects opportunities to donate good to the less fortunate.  We are partnering with Long Island Cares to collect items that they have listed here.

We are also changing the format of the show exceptionally for the next two shows to jams with captains… but since we ARE a variety show, we will also have sketch, some stand up and / or music and a big big BIG surprise at the end of the show that, believe me, you don’t want to miss!

Make reservations following the link above.

Here is our Facebook event page that we are updating with jam captains.

Here is our Facebook page - please like us!

And you can also follow us on Twitter!

We are sooooooooooo in tune with social media, you guys, it’s cray cray! 

lougonzalez:

buzzfeed:

Congratulations Tammy Baldwin, you’re now the first openly gay senator in American history.

Get it gurl!

The new face of America - diversity! 

The exit poll largely told the story. In the nineteen-to-twenty-nine age group, Obama won sixty per cent of the vote. He got ninety-three per cent of the black vote, seventy per cent of the hispanic vote, and seventy-five per cent of the Asian vote. Fifty-six per cent of women voted for him, as did sixty-three per cent of unmarried people, two-thirds of secular voters, and about four-fifths of gays and lesbians.

“A Victory for Obama and Obama’s America” by John Cassidy | New Yorker

A change isn’t going to come. A change is already here.

(via megsokay)

Diversity wins.

(via megsokay)

twitterpatedlyyours:

As workers and city officials try tirelessly to get the Big Apple back up and running, it’s worth taking a minute to look at how race keeps the city going. Chances are, if you were stuck inside and had the luxury of ordering a pizza or calling an emergency worker about downed power lines, that worker was likely someone of color. In his presser this morning, Bloomberg noted how dangerous the work is to get the subways back on track. “Subway workers have to walk the thousands of miles of track to inspect the subway tunnels,” the mayor said. Here’s a quick demographic look at New York City’s subway workers:

  • Three out of five urban transit workers are black or Latino.

  • A majority are at least 45 years old.

  • Nearly 80 percent are New York City residents.

  • Almost 35 percent live in Brooklyn.

  • The works is, almost by definition, is a health hazard

It’s almost a right of passage to complain about a city’s subway system, and no matter what city you’re in, transit workers are almost always represented poorly by the media and criticized for issues that are far beyond their control. But it’s in times like these when we all start to realize just how important their work is to our lives.

Diversity rules, you guys. Diversity rules.

(via melissagomez)